Why Aziz Ansari Has Destroyed My Chances, And Why He Is So So Important:

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Arnab Chanda

Throughout my life, even though we’ve never met, Aziz Ansari has consistently beaten me to the punch. It’s becoming a theme. A sometimes very annoying theme. Although, for various reasons I’ll discuss below, I do believe he has been the most important Indian Comedy Actor in the past 10 years.

In his new series on Netflix, Master of None, Aziz Ansari says “There can only be two,” referring to the idea that there can only ever be 2 Indians in one show at any point, max. Studio Executives and Networks are afraid to put any more than that, and they’re afraid most of the time, to even put one on.

I remember when I started doing stand-up in New York City in 2003, and after watching me, a fellow comic asked me “Oh, do you know Aziz Ansari? He’s an young Indian stand up as well.” Aziz was another…

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Love’s Oven is Warm: Baking with Emily Dickinson

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The Not So Innocents Abroad

“Love’s oven is warm” Emily Dickinson wrote to her friend Sarah Tuckerman, on a note that enclosed a gift of slightly scorched handmade sweets, possibly chocolate caramels. If the words were by any other author, one would be forgiven for reading in them a possible sexual double entendre. But Emily Dickinson is enshrined in our memory as the ultimate virgin, the “Queen Recluse” as her friend, the editor Samuel Bowles, described the poet. Dressed always in white, she rarely left her house for thirty years, spending her days tucked away in an upstairs room, writing nearly two thousand poems that few people knew existed until well after her death.

Of course, scholars and fans have long made a cottage industry of identifying Dickinson’s secret failed love affairs: the broken engagement to her brother Austin’s Amherst classmate George Gould; the impossible love for the married Samuel Bowles; the late-life affair with her father’s friend, Judge Otis Phillips…

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Lifetime’s A DEADLY ADOPTION is Brilliant – And Don’t Believe Anyone Who Tells You It’s Not

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cinematically insane

willFor 30 years, Lifetime has been making predictable movies about women in peril, marriages on the skids, and adorable children in danger. These competently produced but uninspired films usually feature familiar faces from TV and provide disposable diversion for the channel’s core female audience.

Saturday night, Lifetime paid homage to that history while simultaneously mocking it with a delightfully bizarre inside joke.

A DEADLY ADOPTION follows the Lifetime blueprint, but with a surprising twist: Will Ferrell and Kristen Wiig, two icons of contemporary comedy, play the lead characters. Ferrell is Robert Benson, a recovering alcoholic and author of self help books. Wiig is his wife Sarah, a stay-at-home mom who operates a baked goods stand at a local farmer’s market, selling sugar free treats concocted for their diabetic daughter Sully (Alyvia Alyn Lind). 

All is ostensibly well until the Bensons decide to take in pregnant, unmarried Bridget (Jessica Lowndes). Sarah, as we learn in the film’s prologue, is…

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